Why Dispense Digital Lenses?

With the Q-2100 you produce digital quality lenses through a patented lens production process that utilizes digital glass molds on both the front and back surfaces of the lens.

This digital process is the only process that eliminates direct machining or polishing of either lens surface for a clarity of vision that cannot be achieved any other way.

Q-2100 digital lenses mirror the surface quality and prescription accuracy of the glass mold to an exacting tolerance.

Each digital lens is processed in premium index materials custom made to the patients finished Rx.

Dispense digital lenses to upgrade the visual clarity of every patient!

Patient Warranties, What Should I offer?

As a Q-2100 or nanoCLEAR AR system owner, you have certain lens warranties that you can pass onto your patients. These warranties carry a real value to you and your patients and can help build a long lasting customer relationship.

  1. Non Adapt: Optical Dynamics offers a 6-month progressive non-adapt warranty from the date the lens is dispensed. If the patient returns their lenses for non adapt, save the lenses and you can return under warranty
  2. Warranty SealPhotochromic: Optical Dynamics offers a 6-month photochromic warranty from the date the lens is dispensed. If the patient returns their lenses for photochromic issues, save the lenses and you can return under warranty
  3. Scratch: If coated with Optical Dynamics’ scratch coat (nanoXT or XTR), Optical Dynamics offers a 12-month scratch warranty from the date the lens is dispensed. If the patient returns their lenses for scratch issues, save the lenses and you can return under warranty. This warranty does not cover abuse of the lens.
  4. nanoCLEAR AR: If coated with nanoCLEAR AR, Optical Dynamics offers a 12-month AR warranty from the date the lens is dispensed. The warranty covers scratching, peeling and crazing. If the patient returns their lenses for these issues, save the lenses and you can return under warranty. This warranty does not cover abuse of the lens.

In order to return under warranty, you must

  1. Provide proof of the date the lens was dispensed and returned along with the reason for the return.
  2. Return in groups of up to 30 pair or 32 pair photochromic (the same quantity as in a bottle of monomer).
  3. Call Optical Dynamics customer service 800-587-2743 to obtain an RMA number.
  4. Once the lenses are returned they will be reviewed and if they comply with the warranty standards will be replaced in like product at the warranty price.

Casting, It’s a Good Thing

So as a staff member, why would I want to cast lenses?

Job security: Ever think it’d be easier to just call a lab and have the lenses made? It is easy. In fact it’s so easy that pretty much anyone can do it. Making lenses requires a little more effort, but it also makes you an integral part of the transaction. The person that makes the lenses is harder to do without than the person that orders them. Making lenses in-house also makes the practice you work for more profitable!

It’s pretty cool: Do you ever think about the direct output of your efforts helping people see? You’re making something that improves their lives. You’re not just an order taker and delivery box. Some stores can’t even tell you what kind of lenses they’re selling. The corporate office or lab decides that for them and doesn’t feel the need to tell customers. If you make the lenses you’ll know more about how they behave and how they should be used. You become a more important part of your customers’ lives.

Keep it local: With economic worries and political unrest around the globe, more people are deciding they’d rather spend their time and money at local businesses. Let your customers know you’re actually MAKING their lenses at your store on equipment that’s made in the USA. If you need something out of range, our lab can probably surface it for you and it’ll still be made in the USA (we cast our own blanks in Louisville, KY and surface them in the same lab).

Differentiate yourself and the business: Remember earlier when we were talking about how easy it is to phone an order in? With Internet eyeglass retailers growing, the consumer can easily “phone in” a prescription too. It’s important to give the customer something they can’t get online, so they’ll want to come to your store. Whether it’s a quick turnaround, intimate knowledge of lenses and materials, or the fact that you’re going to personally make the lenses for the user, you have the opportunity to give your customers something a little more special. There are still lots of people that value a personal touch and want to build relationships with the businesses they frequent. Don’t underestimate the importance of those parts of the transaction.

And remember Casters Do it Better!

 

What Frame Works Best for High Plus or Minus?

Ask the Labs, Eyecare Business

If a patient has a high-plus or high-minus Rx, which frame characteristics should be taken into consideration to ensure it will work best with the lenses?

When working with a patient with a high-plus or high-minus lens Rx, say over four or five diopters in total power, the following tips can help:

In general, rounder and smaller shapes are best for reducing edge thickness. One key factor in reducing edge thickness is picking a frame that requires the least amount of decentration. Decentration is the natural enemy of high-power lenses, as decentration increases, so does edge thickness. Another way to look at it: The closer the geometric center of each eye is to the pupil, the less edge thickness there will be.

Of course, other aspects of frame choice also have a role to play. A frame that hides more of the lens edge will help improve aesthetics— with plus lenses the thickness will tend to be in the nasal, with minus lenses it will be the temple edge. Be careful with drills and rimless groove frames; instead consider zyl or metal frames with thicker eyewires.

As for wraps, they are designed for lower powers, typically from -3.00D to +3.00D, and can become risky above this range. For wraps in general, we strongly recommend consulting the frame manufacturer to determine the lens range the frames were designed to accommodate.

— Swen Carlson, vice president, operations, VSP Optics Group

What to Consider in a Lens

A Look at Lens Materials by Jenean Carlton, ABOC, Eyecare Business

Given all the considerations of lens materials, how do you make a decision about the best lens material for your patients?  First, learn about the patient’s prescription and lifestyle needs and then research data about materials.

Index of Refraction: Index of refraction indicates how readily a lens material will refract a bean of light. The higher the index of refraction, the more the material will bend light rays. The higher the index of refraction, the thinner the lenses can be processed. Plus power lenses are thinner in the center when fabricated and minus lenses are thinner on the edges.

Abbe Value: White light is made up of the visible spectrum of wavelengths from 380nm to 760nm, with each wavelength corresponding to different colors of light. The higher the Abbe value of a material, the less likely it is to have problems with dispersion or chromatic aberration, which is perceived as color fringing or off axis blurring in the lens periphery.

Specific Gravity: Specific gravity is a measurement that determines a lens material’s weight. The lower the density or specific gravity of a material the lighter it will be when fabricated into a lens.

Reflectance: All lenses reflect at least a small percentage of light; some reflect a significant amount depending on the refractive index of the material. The higher the materials refractive index, the greater the percentage of light reflected from the lens surfaces. (END ARTICLE)

At Optical Dynamics, our clearLIGHT advantage lens combines the best of all attributes:

  • Thin – Premium Index
  • Light Weight – 1.20 g/cm3
  • High ABBE Value = 40
  • UVA & UVB Protection
  • Exceeds FDA Standards
  • Drillable
  • Excellent Tint Absorption

Are You Kidding?

Eyecare Business by Stephanie K. De Long

Tip #1 Be Visual & Verbal – Marketing and message have to take into consideration not just the age of kids but also whether your communication is meeting their learning styles. That’s often overlooked.

Tip #2 Understand the Essence – Whether you’re talking about a product, program, or promotion, this is an exercise that has proved very useful at Youth Market Systems in the development and marketing stages.

kidsTip #3 Consider Identification Patterns – Whether it’s a real person or – in terms of character identification – an animal or cartoonlike personality, you can understand identification patterns: how a child relates to and interacts with things and people.

Tip #4 One Size Won’t Fit All – Whether attempting to market through advertising, print, promotions, or the Internet, certain generalizations are often applied. Some work, Some definitely don’t.

Is it All About Index?

Simple Answer: No

It’s easy to get swept up in the excitement over a single number: higher index must be better. The simplicity is enticing. As with many technical topics, the reality is that a single performance aspect doesn’t provide enough information to judge true product quality. The idea that a lens with a certain index of refraction is a dead product or the next great thing just isn’t correct.

The More Technical Answer: Still No

If you’re into numbers, beyond index you also have to look at Abbe value, surface smoothness, processing-related deviation from target curves, required center and edge thickness (both for safety and the requirements of the frame it’s going in), lens power, your patient’s tolerance of chromatic dispersion, their eye movement patterns, the conscientiousness and equipment quality of the lab you’re using, etc. If you think it’s a lot to digest, imagine what it’s like for a patient trying to make the right decision.

Back To Simple: What’s the Wearer Say?

If you don’t want to spend the rest of your life trying to understand the minutia of every new lens that comes out, ask the people that have experience with the product. Optical Dynamics lenses have been judged by wearers and experts as some of best lenses they’ve encountered. Whether it’s a single vision or multifocal lens, people are impressed with the clarity and ease of patient adaptation. In the end, that’s really all those technical details are trying to convey anyway. Instead of using a bunch of time trying to decide if “the next great thing” is really that great, using a proven lens that wearers like can be safer and simpler.

The less simple explanation for the high praise we’ve received is that our lenses have exceptionally smooth surfaces, they precisely replicate the digital curves machined into our molds, and they are made from a lightweight, high Abbe polymer. Since the process eliminates the grinding and polishing steps normally used to make a lens, there are far fewer opportunities for machine or operator issues to cause optical problems.

A Fly In the High-Index Soup

The vexing thing about high-index lens materials is that the very people that need them most are also the most likely to experience one of their typical shortcomings. The more extreme the prescription, the more likely it is the wearer will be troubled by chromatic aberration in lower Abbe materials. For the most part, indices around the low 1.6’s are about the current limit on good Abbe performance. If you’re worried about chromatic dispersion, you can’t increase index greatly beyond where Optical Dynamics lenses are, so there’s not much thickness improvement to be gained. There can be significant cost differences though.

So if you have a moderate to low prescription where you don’t need the benefits of a high-index lens, high-index materials work very reliably. Hmmm, not the best story. It’s even less motivating when you think about the center and edge thicknesses required to produce a safe and sturdy lens for today’s rimless frames.

Don’t Just Take Our Word On It

When we say you should be using our lenses, there’s obviously a little bias involved. For a more impartial opinion, here’s what one of our customers has to say about them:

“Over the past couple years I have personally worn some of the “best” custom made progressive lenses available and the optics of the digital lenses from the Q-2100 are as good if not better. I am extremely impressed with the digital lenses the system produces and so are my patients.”

David Holliday, OD – Practicing since 1980 – Q-2100 user since 2000

Build Your Own Discount Plan for Local Employers

According to an AOA Third-Party/Managed Care Survey, “the typical OD patient profile includes 50.5% of patients covered by private insurance plans.” Although managed care acceptance does help increase patient traffic, it may not always help increase practice profits. As this trend continues to expand, creating your own discount plan for local employers can help you compete and profit in the growing managed care market.

As a Q-2100 system owner you have a unique advantage in creating your own discount vision plan. By promoting the clearLIGHT, sunSMART, ultraSUN and nanoCLEAR AR products you produce in office, you have a very controlled cost of goods. For Rx orders that are outside of your production range, you can supplement at Q-owner prices through Vision Dynamics Lab. By utilizing your proprietary products, you don’t have to guess or spend countless hours trying to figure out how a discount plan will affect your profits. You can be confident that the program will help grow your business.

Set up a program that gives a certain percentage or dollar amount off the services and eyewear you provide. Offer the program to small and medium sized local employers who do not currently offer a vision care plan to their employees.  Offer the program at no cost to the employers and your program becomes a value added benefit they can offer their staff and families.

Create the collateral material that explains your program with what is included and what is not. Assign an identification code to each business you are going to solicit. Create a membership card with the identification code that explains the discount program that can be handed out to their employees. Track the visits via the identification code to track your success.

Dispensing Glass

Did you know Optical Dynamics’ partner lab Vision Dynamics Laboratory is the largest independent glass lens processor in the U.S.?

Read a Q&A on dispensing glass as shared in Eyecare Business

Question: Are there restrictions on using glass lenses?

Answer: In general, most people benefit from the superior visual clarity provided by glass lenses. In higher prescriptions, the dispense and customer must manage the frame dimensions. Glass lenses are usually contra-indicated for children, those patients participating in high-impact activities or anyone who has limited vision in one eye. Mike Yager, Vision Dynamics Lab.

Question: Does dispensing glass lenses present any particular challenges in fitting or processing?

Answer: Processing glass lenses presents some interesting challenges for labs. As a glass lens processor yo must have specific equipment dedicated to only processing glass. The lab mus also have people experienced in processing glass which is quite different than plastic. Each index has its own characteristics and nuances including how lenses are chem-hardened at the end of the process. Because of this only a handful of labs are comfortable or skilled in processing glass. Mike Yager, Vision Dynamics Lab

Reduce Spectacle Remakes

IMan Fitting Glasses on Girln an article published in Optometric Management, author and Q-2100 system owner Dr. Davis shares five steps to help optical professionals reap the benefits of providing an optimum pair of glasses. No one wants upset patients claiming they can’t see out of their new eyeglasses in a waiting room full of patients!

Step One: Double check the refraction. According to Dr. Davis, “I rarely change a prescription more that +/-0.75D so when a patient’s prescription has changed more than that amount I have found the number of remakes increase, so I always examine the patients previous refractions to ensure I haven’t made an error prior to recording the new Rx.”

Step Two: Manage the patient’s expectations. “If the patient’s prescription has changed significantly, educate them on what specifically they can expect with the new prescription,” says Dr. Davis. “And always take the time to educate first time progressive wearers,” added Davis.

Step Three: Have a well educated optical staff. “Always make sure your staff understands appropriate frame selection, pupillary distance and seg height along with proper patient positioning,” advises Davis.

Step Four: Always check lens powers. “Another way to prevent spectacle remakes is to always check the lenses your lab produces as soon as they arrive,” recommends Davis. By checking the lenses before they are dispensed you can catch any lab production errors.

Step Five: Provide a written policy. Dr. Davis recaps his recommendations with the suggestion for a written policy. “Give your patients a written policy on re-makes before they leave the office with their new spectacles. Although completely avoiding spectacle remakes is impossible, the five aforementioned tips can reduce them and result in more happy patients,” Davis adds.